History of the U.S. and Honduras

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Summary

Honduras joined the Federation of Central American States that included Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and El Salvador two years following its 1821 independence from Spain. In the 1900s, U.S. companies established banana plantations throughout Honduras that dominated the economy. Honduras has supported U.S. policy in its neighboring countries of Nicaragua and El Salvador.

Recognition

U.S. Recognition of Honduran Independence, 1824 and 1853.

The United States recognized the independence of the Federation of Central American States from Spain on August 4, 1824, when President James Monroe received Mr. Canaz as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. The Federation consisted of the States of Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Salvador. After the breakup of the Federation from 1838-1840, the United States recognized Honduras as a separate, independent state on April 19, 1853, by the appointment of Solon Borland as U.S. Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Honduras, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and El Salvador.

Diplomatic Relations

Establishment of Diplomatic Relations, 1853.

Diplomatic relations were established on April 19, 1853, when American Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary Solon Borland was appointed to Honduras, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and El Salvador. Borland did not present his credentials in Tegucigalpa, though he was accredited to Honduras.

Establishment of the American Legation in Tegucigalpa, 1856.

The American Legation in Comayagua and Tegucigalpa was opened on February 22, 1856. The first Minister Resident to reside in Honduras was James R. Partridge, who presented his credentials on April 25, 1862.

Elevation of American Legation to Embassy Status, 1943.

Following a joint announcement on March 23, 1943 between the United States and seven American Republics that included Honduras, the Legations in the respective nations and the United States were raised to the status of Embassy. John D. Irwin was promoted to Ambassador.